06/28/08 53 W - + 15 - 15 Tokyo Fire Department New Year's Fire Review


Here's a treat via YouTube, footage from the Tokyo Fire Department's annual New Year's Fire Review. Fire trucks, fire boats, fire helicopters. Synchronized streams, synchronized rappelling, synchronized aerials. Bet it's a blast in person. Music by Richard Wagner, "Ride of the Valkyries" without vocals.





Here are two more trippy videos, from 2006. Earthquake response, with simulated fire and rescue scenarios. The second clip show a motorcycle crew, and some sort of backpack “pop nozzle.” Plus their earthmoving equipment. Now that’s a department equipped for USAR!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J1bDo_Uxf..
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xq7fkx1cy..

And here’s an old-fashioned parade. Those are some seriously annoying sirens!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-as-rhrvO..
Legeros - 06/28/08 - 22:37

Judging from Tokyo FD’s experience with some pretty big building fires (along with several other Japanese cities) I would venture that these guys have some pretty impressive capabilities, given the large amount of what seems to be specialized apparatus that I have seen in many different sources.
DJ (Email) - 06/29/08 - 12:50

NFPA article from 2002 about TFD, http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa..

Largest FD in the world, with 17,993 employees and a $2 billion budget. Some 1,839 pieces of apparatus and 80 fire stations protecting 12 million residents. Approximately 6,933 fires per year, or about 19 per day. In 2001, 4,044 of these were structure fires. Each year they receive a million emergency calls, and perform 570,000 ambulance runs, 60 percent of which are for minor injuries. There are also 24,434 trained volunteer fire corps members, for disaster response.
Legeros - 06/29/08 - 12:59

I would be curious to see how Tokyo’s stats compare to other cities, such as New York, London, Seoul, Berlin, etc. Or even closer to home, a comparison of Raleigh/Wake County’s stats to similarly sized cities throughout the world.

As I recall in my travels most cities in the world do not have the same size pumpers as we do, usually smaller.
DJ - 06/29/08 - 13:15

New York population in 2000, over 8 million. From FDNY report in 2002, total structure fires: 26,248. Total medical emergencies, 158,461. Today, says Wikipedia, FDNY has some 13,800 uniformed members. Looks like 220 fire stations, from http://www.n2nov.net/fdny_locations.html

Berlin population today, 3.4 million. BFD has approximately 3,800 members, and 38 fire stations. Yearly budget of $283 million. In 2006, says a translated Wiki entry, they also had 58 volunteer fire brigades, and 42 youth brigades. They had 709 vehicles plus 43 “swap bodies” (pods?), 76 “supporters” (support vehicles), four “machines” (heavy equipment), 30 “rescue” and 2 “delete” (rescue and recovery?) boats. In 2006, they responded to 8,233 fires.

London population in 2006, 7,355,400. Nearly 7,000 members, and 112 stations. Operational fleet with 267 pieces of apparatus, plus 100+ reserves and 25 for training. In 2005-06, attended 16,000 serious fires.

Seoul population in 2007, 10,421,782. The Seoul Metropolitan Fire and Disaster Management Department has… 22 fire stations, or says Wikipedia. Can that be right? City is 233 square-miles in size, or twice that of Raleigh. Their official site: http://www.fire.seoul.kr/

Paris population in 2006, 2,167,994. They had 8,340 personnel who man 81 stations and facilities, and operate 463 pieces of equipment: 130 pumpers, 63 aerials, 66 ambulances, 71 command and patrol vehicles, and 133 special units including boats, helos, ATVs, four-wheel drive vehicles, etc.
Legeros - 06/29/08 - 13:52

Seoul is correct. I was there a few years back. Fire stations are few and far between.

A pattern has emerged: large cities around the world have what appears to be smaller fire departments— fewer stations, fewer trucks, fewer personnel, and fewer calls in, for most of them, older structures.

Mike, I can’t pull it up, but maybe you can. A comparison of fire apparatus types from city to city. Like, how do their pumpers compare to ours, their ladder trucks, and their staffing.
DJ (Email) - 06/29/08 - 14:36

Seoul might differentiate between “fire stations” and “branch fire stations”. I think that in Tokyo, Seoul, and Taipei that the “fire stations” will have pumpers, ladders, and chiefs. The smaller “branch fire stations” will have pumpers only.
Peter Sz (Email) - 08/21/09 - 14:44



  
Remember personal info?

/ Textile

Comment moderation is enabled on this site. This means that your comment will not be visible on this site until it has been approved by an editor.

To prevent spam we require you to answer this silly question
 

  (Register your username / Log in)

Notify:
Hide email:

Small print: All html tags except <b> and <i> will be removed from your comment. You can make links by just typing the url or mail-address.