01/24/15 231 W, 3 I - + 3 - 1 Updated - Fuel Truck vs. Fire Engine in Wilmington - 1959


January 24
Here are a couple more photos as passed along from our friends at the Wilmington Fire Department. Click once or twice to enlarge:
 


Courtesy Wilmington Fire Department

January 1
Cover of a deteriorating copy of Hose & Nozzle magazine, January 1960. Date to be determined, presuming the prior year. Maybe November or December. See more magazine covers (including this one, to be added). Here's the story as printed:

Five Wilmington Firemen Hurt in Crash

A fire truck speeding to answer a pre-dawn alarm at Wilmington, N.C., crashed into an oil tanker loaded with 6,500 gallons of gasoline.

The collision spilled firemen from their perch on the truck and ripped open the oil tanker. Five firemen were injured, including three who were hospitalized. Their injuries were not believed serious.

Almost all of the tanker's load of gasoline poured into the street. Firemen sprayed water on the pavement and then flushed drains for an area four blocks long, running to the Cape Fear River, and two blocks wide.

The fuel was not ignited bu tthe clearing operating lasted about five hours.

The firemen were answering a call at the Cape Fear Hotel.

Injured were Capt. Ellis Eugue Casteen, Burleigh A. Scotton, S. C. Hill, Ray Smith, and Charles Edward Bland.

The driver of the oil truck was not injured.

Click to enlarge:
 





Hey Mike, interesting note on this wreck. Firefighter S.C. Hill, who was on the truck, is Sam Hill Sr., who went on to become chief of the department from 1988-2008.
Chris Nelson - 01/22/15 - 15:35



  
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