02/13/07 285 W - + 13 - 9 Fire Engine Test, 1906


From the February 1, 1906 edition of the News & Observer: "The test of the steam fire engine, which is made about once a month, in order to see if the engine is in good working order, was made yesterday afternoon on Fayetteville Street, the engine being positioned at the post office corner.

While the test is regarded as a necessary thing, there were not a few citizens who yesterday afternoon questioned the necessity for using Fayetteville Street. For nearly an hour the testing was kept up with various styles of nozzle, and the high stream, aided by the wind gave a rainfall effect all along the street and sidewalk beyond the Yarborough House. So heavy was this at times that passers by had to halt or hurry into buildings to escape the water, as yesterday was not a day for umbrellas.

Another complaint was that the puffing and blowing of the engine tends to frighten horses. Mr. T. B. Mosley had a rough time while the engine was performing, as for fully a half hour he had to stand at the head of his horse, hitched in the front of his office, which was threatening to run away, at times other men having to assist him.

The question raised by Mr. Mosley and others is as to the need of having the test made on Fayetteville Street, where many vehicles pass and where there is every danger of accident or a runaway, and where the water that indiscriminately falls in the street and on the sidewalk interferes greatly with people passing up and down the street, as was the case yesterday. The answer to the question is of course with the fire department authorities."





  
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